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in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
in the marketplace of ideas. there's good reason for that. creature grew up in environments where we were always subject to threat. we're looking at that thing that is going to hurt us. we are no longer in the environment. we're in a complex economy the inner dependent that really relies on organizations to provide us with the necessities. so we have to update our thinking, and think longer term, focus on stories that actually represent trends, and not compage -- exaggerate noise. we have to get away from fear. fear played a role in the development of human societies in the earliest stages, it's encoded in the dna, but to evolve, to a sort of complex modern stliermt we live in, we have to update the most basic aspects, so that's what your question speaks to if. >> -- full venture capitalist? >> you know, the opposite of that might be say, well, venture capitalist has to be inherently optimistic, why would you invest in thing where there are uncertain returns and so forth. telling the story about "the coming prosperity." that's a story, you know, easily characterized. and i really don't see it th
something we can do about. it's how the thing we're doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction, you know, soon after the earthquake in haiti thereu was an earthqua in chile that killed on slightly same level or killed less than 100 people.at and ours ended up killing so many people. we are a city of badly constructed buildings and all of the things. people had been forced to leave the country side to come to the city to work. you had the den population.oce we often discuss these things and how the environment, howse erosion, how the land, how the fact that we have to burn ourn i trees forn charcoal causes us have the massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goest through. so these things, too, i thinka more of the things question do something about as a community. we that -- the other theory are also -- [inaudible] talked about.t >> in reading through "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" i was struck by the fact that so manyb writers yearn in a sense to return to haiti. >> i think so many
, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on t
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional panelists who will give us their
that without objection. item 3. >> item number 3, resolution authorizing the department of the environment to retroactively accept and expend a grant in the amount of $250,000 from the sidney e. frank foundation to plan and implement specific projects to source 100% of san francisco's electrical demand from renewable energy sources from july 15, 2012, through june 15, 2013. >> thank you very much. >> supervisors, guillermo [speaker not understood] with the department of environment. the department encourages the committee to approve and recommend the accept and expend grant from the sidney e. frank foundation for $250,000. the grant will enable the department of the environment to continue developing plans for san francisco to be 100% of its electricity demand from renewable energy qu sources. * meet currently the city-wide profile is 41% renewable. the department will draw upon recommendations contained in a recently completed mayor's renewable energy task force report. among the supported programs will be initiatives to expand in city renewables, primarily solar systems, advance regulat
that is off a horrible environment but it is still getting better. its getting better because taxes are going to go up? >> go g no. that's not going to help things. it will mke them worse. and there is a mild improvement. i would hope for a strong improvement. i don't expect to see it. and what has just been done is not going to improve things. sadly, it will make california even less competitive than before. neil: voters must have known that was the talk and advertising against these propositions when they started? >> well they --. neil: obviously voters thought otherwise. >> hard to know what they think. i thought i, i used to think i knew but, in the old days they were not crazy about taxes but i think there's been a shift. i think more and more people think they will not have to bear the burden. and therefore, why not. and the other thi was that frankly governor brown used education as a hostage, saying that it was necessary to avoid almost 6 billion in cuts to education. i don't accept that. there were a lot of things he could have cut. there are a lot of things that are not necessary an
. >> the average woman is not as strong as the average man. and we -- it's a very physical physical environment. >> reporter: retired marines general myatt says infantry are physically overwhelming for men. >> you would have to ask yourself, is this the situation that we would like to say we're going to put our daughters in just so that they have an opportunity to advance in a career? >> reporter: active first lieutenant coleen ferril -- farrell is part of the suit despite disapproval from her commanders. >> there was some opposition but they knew this was something i was very passionate about. >> reporter: david steveson, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> more details now on women in combat. pentagon statistics show that more than 144 women troops have been killed in the wars in iraq and afghanistan and more than 860 women have been injured. of the 205,000 u.s. troops currently serving in afghanistan about 20,000 of them are women. >>> it's a world many of us don't know. a surprising report on domestic workers and what they're put through by their employers. >>> help wanted why president obama is aski
. as more do, it will create an environment for us to reach an agreement. we need the same willingness to step 4 on the left to be able to meet in this room at the table or wherever the room maybe and to come to an agreement that will lead us forward. one thing i am hoping for is if we can reach an agreement, in principle before the end of the year, then implement it, i believe this is what many have been waiting for to launch a more spirited recovery. if we get this done, if we have a credible $4 trillion deficit reduction plan signed and sealed, signed by the president, what does that say to the rest of the world? many economies in europe and other places are struggling, but ours will be the strongest in the world in terms of the future. it takes a lot of hard work but it is worth the effort. all will prosper. saturday night, my wife and i went to see a movie by spielberg. about another gentleman who lived in illinois for a while named abraham lincoln. toward the end of the movie, daniel day-lewis was sitting across from confederates and there was talk about what the war was all abou
to create a environment that will make you spend a lot more money. don, i always say the psychology is meeting the environmental forces. you only have to adjust the environment a little bit to change your behavior. it can be used for positive or for corporations to get us to dig into our pocketbooks. >> and they serve you coffee, because it gives you a rush in the restaurant. >> they wish they could serve you wine. >> well, listen about christmas, if they have discovered that holiday music actually makes you buy more. but fast-paced upbeat holiday music doesn't. you need to put on slow to medium-paced music and will spend a lot more. even since, one study in switzerland shows that if they infuse the air of the store with just a light orange scent, shoppers spend even more, so really, we're being highly manipulated when we walk into a mall. >> we're going a little bit off the story, but there was a survey not that long ago, about a man who smells like cinnamon rolls, women are attracted to them. but maybe it is the other way around, the men that came in a woman's home, smelled the ci
is in it that makes it so bad for your car? it is great for the environment i would assume? >> well, it is made from corn. what is happening a lot of farmers are saying you know what? we'll start producing corn rather than other products. that is why your groceries gotten so expensive. on the other hand what this is very highly corrosive, so corrosive it has to be distributed to gas stations in stainless steel tanks which are hauled by diesel vehicles of all things. but when merged with the gasoline in your gas pump, wherever you pump your gas into the vehicle that's when they merge the two together. what happens is, it is so bad something called phase separation where the ethanol heavier goes to the bottom of the tank. now your vehicle, whether running on e-10 at every gas station which is mandatory or e15 which they would love to shove down our thoughts. what happens, starts off with separation. your gas tank is drying ethanol. so it destroys fuel systems. i have proof because i talk to companies that manufacture fuel lines. they have brand new vehicles with rotted out fuel systems. they have to p
detrimental thing to the environment that could ever occur but i think what they're missing is, canadian oil sands only produce .1of 1% of. we have to get the facts out there and i think most folks understand that this oil is important to energy security. it is important to job creation. it is important to economic stimulus. and, if it is denied, we don't have any, net benefit to the environment. we only have a net detriment to the economy and to energy security. that is why the polling is in our favor. melissa: not only that, if they're talking what will happen to the environment if the pipeline doesn't go through, it dsn't mean that you're not going to take oil from those oil sands in canada. it just means that oil is not going to come to the u.s., right? you're not not going to develop that resource, it will just end up going to asia if we don't build the pipeline, right? >> i think as the chie economiss of the international energy agency today said, the world demand is growing and we need every drop of canadian oil. so canadian oil sands is going to get developed. it will get developed r
oil. that's where i want to get. i spent several years as chairman of the environment and public works committee and several years as the ranking member. all during that time people keep saying the one thing we all agree on is we need to be off of foreign oil. we need not to be dependent upon the middle east. and yet right now we know and no one is going to refute this fact, no one today, or in the future, that when we had the usgs report and the other reports saying that we now are in a different position than we've been before. we are not only -- we do not have only 2% as some people are saying, of the reserves in fossil fuels. i'm talking about coal, oil and gas. we are number one in the world now. we didn't used to be. two years ago we couldn't have said that. right now we are. we have the -- the opportunity and we can look at the opportunity in terms of our -- of our reserves that are usable of being totally self-sufficient. this is the thing so disturbing when people talk about they don't want to be dependent on the middle east therefore we have to spend billions of dollars of de
residents are being forcibly displaced. they say the mining operations are damaging the environment. the protests were unauthorize and the crackdown was carried out according to to international standards. the country's opposition leader visited the area on thursday evenin through dialogue.sution government officials said during an inspection of the mine last week that if operations come to a stop china could be angered. >>> disputing centering on the south china sea has caused political and economic repercussions. the philippine government says it will not stop visas. >> reporter: around 20 activists gather in manila on thursday to denounce china's latest move. this is the new passport design the chinese government has been issuing since may. the philippine government filed a protest with china over a map printed inside which includes islands claimed by both countries. on wednesday the philippine department of foreign affairs announced it will no longer issue visa stamps in the passports. >> we're saying that's fine. you can come into the philippines but we he not stamp the passpor
continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a se
environment. and can you having to the point, san francisco featured very prominently was [speaker not understood], with urban ar tour and urban gardens, was shared space. many of the projects were identified by name and our own, our very own david winslow was featured when he was participating as a private architect with linden alley. this is just one of many, it was beautifully put together, all the design, [speaker not understood]. and i was really proud. and i hope that somewhere on the web all of you will take a moment to see how good we looked. >> commissioner sugaya. >> another piece from the chronicle. it's actually sunday datebook and it's in their way back machine column. this goes back to 1987, november 20th. i'll just read it. it is pertinent to the planning process. it says "november 20th, czar -- charlotte [speaker not understood] has lost the fight to prevent her neighbor from blocking her view of golden gate bridge. san francisco board of appeals by a 5 to 0 vote reversed a planning commission -- reversed a planning commission vote against the fourth floor rooftop a
, political reality. we spent too much -- political environment, political reality. we spend too much money to change the law. it is a difficult political situation we have. only one government in our history since 1948 has fulfilled a legal term. it was the gold my air -- golda meierboal th government, thanks to the yom kippur wall. our decision in this election to move forward as one big party was the first up towards this political reform. it is impossible to only preach and teach to others. you must give yourself some example of what you're willing to do. it was a small party that started as a liberal party. step after step, they took the power. for real political forms, we need political blocs, and i hope to see it the next knesset this new reality, presidential elections, four or five big parties. >> first of all, thank you again for joining us. i do not think if you ran research in the streets of tel aviv or washington you would find a lot of people who know who rousseau and voltaire are. if we want to wait until the palestinians know who they are, it is going to be a while. so let's
bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
approximately 3 to 5 days of solid training to make sure that they are going to be working in a safe environment to learn what's going on. and most of the time that, the incidents in california will become mitigated. now, not to say that we certainly have that as an option. we have a fairly robust what we call fire crew program using cdcr inmate fire fighters. it is on our radar and it's something that we have as a contingency if we needed to do it. >> lieutenant colonel. >> yes, general, in the mou it does address the ground portion but the focus of effort is mainly on the aviation side but it is built in there for the ground side if necessary. >> i just want to say in 2008 we did activate hand crews to fight fires and we've identified soldiers throughout the state to respond if needed. they've got the tools that they need, the boots and all that cached and available. it's really just a matter of getting the call and being ready to go. >> i was going to end with general myat. i know we've trained soldiers to do that kind of thing. after the colorado fires just recently they did put a lot o
the environment and take away some of the industries. >> you all yell at us, these last two stories are incredible. for more information, just head to abc2news.com/holiday guide. you can find addresses for the best places to see light displays and christmas parades. >> baltimore elementary schoolers are getting reading help to make sure they excel. the mayor announced the program. it pairs tutors with third graders. >> our objective is to increase the rate of learning. >> the program targets third graders because it's those early school years when kids are taught to read. if they aren't reading well by third grade, they risk falling behind. >>> amazon, the company behind the kindle e reader is launching a special subscription for kids. it will be available in the next couple of weeks as part of an automatic software update. their target is kids between three and eight. for $5 a month they will get access to videos, games and, of course, children books. >>> did you feel the change today? i think you did between the mornings midday and evening. temperatures keep falling. 49 at bwi, making it feel co
allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
there are people like tyson for years. we need to make sure that protection of the environment is part of government. so i like the fact that there is balance there. but let's not lose sight of the fact that this is a big success story. we don't need to have a regulates economy. we need to give the private sector enough breathing room and make sure that we don't brush this initiative. i'm optimistic for the first time in a long time. >> what did you say? free market unregulated economy? >> that is my fantasy. i can't believe it. that we are in agreement on protecting the environment. if the people don't want it, they won't do it. anyway, tyson, thank you. dan mitchell, thank you. now let's talk about california with crashing production and a 13% top state income tax rate. no kidding. no surprise. companies are fleeing the state. but where will they end up? we are about to show you. those little things still get you. for you, life's about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's ri
calvillo: item 26 is a resolution authorizing the department of environment to retroactively accept and expend a grant in the amount 400,000 from the u.s. department of environment, environmental protection to support brown fields assessment projects. >> president chiu: same house same call? this resolution is adopted. item 27. >> clerk calvillo: item 27 resolution authorizing the department of emergency management to retroactively accept and expend a fiscal year 2012 program grant in the amount of 29 million from the us department of homeland security through the california emergency management agency for the periods of october 12, 2012 through may 31, 2014. >> president chiu: same house same call, the resolution is adopted. >> clerk calvillo: item 28 a mast lease extension for the department of ha public health n mission street for approximately 32.36 million per month with annual increases. >> president chiu: same house same call, this resolution is adopted. next item. >> clerk calvillo: item 29 is a resolution authorizing the department of public health to retroactively accept a
to the environment and community would be to use the degaussing station as a clubhouse for the kids so they have shelter, restroom facilities, and a place to store their equipment. if rec and park doesn't want to pay for it, even though they just received about $200 million, i would be willing to fund it myself as a contribution to the city. i'm looking for six votes here. who want to put the environment and the welfare of the children ahead of the dollars of a restaurant lease. do the right thing. and vote against this restaurant lease on december 4. and with all due respect, supervisor farrell, i ask you again, with the association, with the hospitality industry, and$á( mz your own father pitchg this restaurant, do the decent and honorable thing and recuse yourself from this vote. thank you. >> president chiu: i want to remind the public there's a rule in the board chamber that we not address individual members in your public comment. if you could address all your comments to the full board. thank you. >> hi. i'm nichole preato i'm a resident on marina boulevard. thank you. hi. i recently fou
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
of the side of the house go to those victims, and our thanks go to the emergency services and the environment agency for the fantastic job that they do. let me also associate myself with his remark about the leveson report which we published tomorrow. i hope we can work on an all party bases. this is a once in a generation opportunity for real change. and i hope that this house can make it happen. mr. speaker, when the work program was launched in june 2011, the prime minister described it as, and i quote, the biggest and boldest program since the great depression. 18 months on, can the update the house on how it is going? >> yes icann. i can update out to over 800,000 people have taken part in the work program. over half came off benefits. over 200,000 people have gotten into work because of the work program. but i think it is worth remembering that the work program is dealing with the hardest to work cases there are in our country. these are people, adults have been out of work for over a year, and young people have been out of work for over nine months. on that basis yes, we need to make f
department of environment a grant of 400,000 from united states department of environmental protection for preparing cleanup plans for potentially contaminated areas in southeast san francisco in support of the bluegreenway project for period of october 1st, 2012 through october 31, 2015. >> supervisor chu, supervisor avalos, mr. rodriguez, department of environment. we are here seeking your support of the resolution. it is a grant the department received from the epa to continue our brownfield project effort in the bay view and hunter's point community. this will allow us to go out and inventory brownfield sites, do site assessment, preliminary work and identify properties for potentially linking the blue greenway project to it. this is in partnership with port of san francisco, parks alliance in order to open up greater access to the southeastern waterfront . in addition this was announced with the epa as a companion effort. the epa awarded 400,000 in workforce training to hunter's park family and workforce for collaborating with hunter's point family so their folks have an opportuni
, antidote for this low growth economic environment. it uses proprietary technology, collect data from other measurement technologies and it processes that data that's designed to tell the customers what's needed to improve efficiency of workers out in the field. especially at construction sites and new infrastructure builds. those software builds can cut fuel costs or improve customers service or safety standards. it all comes down to helping other companies to find new ways to squeeze more money out businesses. that's the kind of pitch that never goes out of style. certainly not one that the old trimble could have offered. it's a joint venture with cat pilller where their technology will be sold to cat dealerships for everything to machine control technologies. this gives the company a tremendous outsource international sales force. it looks like it's become the real deal. companies had a conference for the users of the systems. this wasn't a gigantic who la gigantic shindigs, they set a record for attendance. we're not just counting bodies. the reason so many people showed up is because t
, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willin
punitive measures because we don't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultal
, which is hey in the united states if we are looking at this social environment, if anything those factors are going to contribute to more and more diversity. so it's a real, real difficult question, how we relate to new religious movements? how, labeling is not the term i am really looking for but how we understand them in relationship to other people rather, maybe we are talking about a continuum. maybe we don't say sect and cult but we have sort of a continuum of tension, as janet pointed, out with the dominant species that is concerned about the - about resources. and that's a good point. yes, susanna? >> but when you go up to that temple and i haven't been there for probably two or three years now so i am a little fuzzy. but what i remember is the beauty of course of the grounds and the building. but then the videos that you see do contribute to, a bit i thought to his, misconception that it is a joining of all faiths. because in the building, they give space to other great faiths, they give histories of other great faiths. and i came away thinking that possibly it was the bah
of the environment and currently environmental law, but also as a resident of the city. the attempt with the new draft e-i-r impact report characterizes the golf course as unacceptable and has been refuted that san francisco historic advisory commission when there is a clear disagreement such as this, it is a clear indicator that a separate evaluation for the alternative plan is necessary to maintain [speaker not understood], almost done, and the endangered species within it. [speaker not understood] procedural resolution to ensure that the department up holds [speaker not understood] the golf course project from the natural area plan and allows for the environmental review. a yes vote will pave the way for the protection of humans and wildlife [speaker not understood] areas to rely -- >> thank you very much. >>> thank you so much. >> thanks a lot. good job squeezing it all into. >>> good afternoon, supervisors. my name is johnny baldini and my comment is in regards to the recreation and parks department, significant natural resource area management plan for which a final draft plan was approved
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
that produce the evidence-based are done in a sort of a cocoon environment that doesn't mirror, and then the research findings are reported in scientific studies that nobody reads or very few people read: a) because people don't have the time, b) because we almost purposely use language that nobody understands. so, unfortunately, i think these are key limitations to the real translation of research to practice in the field, and not just in behavioral health. dr. peterson, is that true for prevention as well? yes, i would say it is true for prevention as well. there are people who work in real-world settings who are interested in helping prevent problems from occurring-in this case, substance abuse or mental health issues-and they have a lot of constraints on their time. they have a lot of constraints on other resources-could be money, could be technology. and, in terms of bringing research to practice, things that are done in a laboratory or academic setting, if you will, sometimes are not readily translatable into real-world settings with those constraints happening and with a
to try to save our environment, our quality of life. it's far more important than developers or speculators getting their profits. thank you. >>> good afternoon. my name is genie kwok. the proposed changes to san francisco's c-e-q-a procedures have many problems such as incomprehensible appeals deadlines and a five-acre exemption [speaker not understood]. it is on a 20-acre campus. the focus of my talking to you today would be to ask you to please protect the people's input and not allow the proposed changes that decrease opportunities for san franciscans to provide input and influence on projects prior to construction. the proposed shortened time period for appeals and in put provide insufficient time for neighbors to help each other think through the issues and regulations and respond accordingly. while complicated, san franciscans are willing to study the issues and want to provide input. such citizen participation takes time and should be encouraged. i have a picture here and i'm sorry it's small, but i think your machine can make it look bigger. thank you so much. this i
-on environment in a cyclical upturn. >> reporter: now, the other scenario: >> in an environment where we go off the fiscal cliff and we see continued problems on the debt side for the u.s., i think the gold price outperforms the white metals. >> reporter: gold's price will also depend on whether central banks continue to diversify their holdings into gold, and whether they implement more quantitative easing to boost growth. the outlook for platinum is a little more complicated. there have been major supply disruptions due to labor unrest in south africa, which produces nearly all of the world's platinum. it also depends on demand. >> europe is a key part of the platinum demand picture. if europe can recover, certainly that's going to bode well for platinum demand. if the price trades higher, it may affect some of the price- sensitive sectors like jewelry, like chinese jewelry demand. >> reporter: of course, many investors only buy metals for investment reasons. currently, there's over $150 billion invested in gold exchange-traded funds, an all- time high. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: th
in these type of environments and we were able to really take those and learn more about each other for future responses. we were able to take and provide a taylored response package to better serve the customer. again, we don't want to go in with a full package that the state or civil environments aren't really asking for, we want to be sure it's taylored appropriately and it's responsive and timely. we also had the humanitarian assistance coordination center. that's the place we were able to take the non-governmental agencies and the hoetion nation international agencies and have them interacting and coordinating with the military folks so that we were able to provide an understanding of how we all work together. so if you want additional information, if you want to talk to captain napalitano, he is the commanding officer for the expeditionary training group, and he is the -- in charge of the people that train and certify that crisis response adaptive force package. his folks also put together the different events for this, for the exercise. the apan provides us an opportunity to be able
feelings, really create an environment where they are as open and as honest as possible. at the end of the day, with focus groups, i always am aware that whatever people say, that's a huge difference between what they actually do. >> if you have any way of testing their actual actions. put the product up on the site as if it is for sale and see how many people click on it. >>> finally, we have this question from maggie. this is a situation that many small business owners have faced. one of our key employees isn't getting along with everyone else in the business. what should we do? this is hard. it seems like it would be easy. it might be the hardest question we have asked today. >> there is nothing more important than your employees ending the day and your customers with the success of the business. i would take this very seriously even though you might want to hope it gets better. i would facilitate as much conversation as possible between the two people and all the groups of people and try to solve it or make tough decisions as soon as possible. you don't want it to be wait until
ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to watch wha
holding unpopular views. the author contends this environment has increased the country's political and decreased this course. it's about 45 minutes. [applause] thanks so much for having me. i was at that first conference and we had randy barnett speaking over there and was exciting to be here for the inauguration from the organization. i'm going to start on a little bit of a personal note. i'm having a big month and i want to let you know since some of your friends of mine and some of you will be. i just got married on the 12th. [applause] i have a book come out on tuesday called campus censorship and the end of the american debate and i am leaving right after this for my 20 it high school reunion took about how free speech is curtailed on the modern american campus and how i believe it harms us all whether we are on campus or not. why did i write this? i wrote "unlearning liberty" because i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i have a russian father and a british mother and i definitely cam
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added in here for our dog lovers which there are countless many in the city and having an area where the dogs can play with their guardians and having a natural place for this to happen. you see all of the elements happening here and i want to thank
that real demand like we have in the past. >> looking to the new year, the business environment, consumer sentiment, how are things shaping up for ford? >> well, right now it looks like it's going to continue to expand. both in gdp and the industry. based especially on the second half of this year. but again, it is all going to be very dependent on what the economy does and what we do especially in the united states to create an environment where the consumer feels confident and they can purchase these decisions opinions what about europe kux turn those losses into profits. >> we have announced our plan for europe which is similar to what we did in the united states. we will bring more vehicles in to people wanting value and restructuring the operations to getack to profitability but a very, very tough situation in europe economically. >> susie: you said will you step down as c.e.o. in 2014. what do you want to accomplish before you hand over the keys of ford. >> i want to complete the development of this family of vehicles, both for ford and lincoln that are absolutely best in class. and
on both environment and genetics. we have established large networks to collect data and conduct powerful analyses. those networks explore possible causative factors in the environment before, during and after pregnancy. one of these networks published a study that suggests prenatal and early life exposure to car emissions is a factor. in 2012, congress appropriated over $47 million for autism and other developmental disorders. this supports 43 training programs through 41 states and projects for underserved populations. federal agencies also use public-private partnerships to maximize our, such as the nih national data office of research that has an autism depository. this brings together hundreds of researchers and clinicians with tens of thousands of people nationwide affected by asd. there is a call center, web based -- the nih supported the association in the early prevention of autism. in conclusion, since the establishment, wide expertise has come to bear on autism with research rapidly translating into individuals and the community. coordinated efforts to identify best practices t
're particularly involved in environmental factors this is something that involves the city environment. and it's something that dirties the environment and we're involved in keeping a clean area in the school and city. while our impact isn't great we do give people an outlet to help their community rather than hurt it and we do teach them what kind of real impact it does have, both monetarily and to people and their quality of life. >> thank you. at this time i will open public comment on item no. 36789 seeing none, public comment is now closed. [ gavel ] made chair? >> yes i'm just looking right now the applicant is under 18 years old and in the charter all members of boards and commissions must be of legal voting age unless the authorizing legislation sets
to the 2% level. of course, we want to take advantage of the low interest rate environment we have currently. and the series b bonds will be longer term debts up to 30 years and that's estimated at right around 4%. a little more details on the refunding. again, this is meant to take out our 2003 bonds, current -- if current market conditions stay as they currently are, we're anticipating a net present value savings of 14% which is pretty extraordinary, or about $31 million of savings coming back to the rate payer. again, just like mortgages and that sort of thing, we're refunding our bonds to the lower interest rate environment. there are some details on what we'll be refunding in terms of the current debt and the charter provides the authorization for us to bring this forward for your consideration. in term of the new money bonds, we're spending approximately as i mentioned $420 million authorization. that's mainly to fund projects that were appropriated in fiscal 11 and fiscal 12. so, again, we're just in time financing here. we're bringing forward this transaction for your consi
. and we have had great exposure being in the [speaker not understood] environment as well. we have been able to reach out to people not only in san francisco and bay area, but also [speaker not understood] area and around the world which is part of the surf rider foundation's mission statement. we are an international [speaker not understood] and to go to an event likes this helps us to take care of our coastlines and work with the [speaker not understood]. thank you. >>> thanks for taking the time to listen to us. my name is calvin schneider, [speaker not understood], located in the mission and [speaker not understood] outside lands the last four years. i've also done a large variety of other seiberttionv from carnival to pride to [speaker not understood] * events. we work next to companies that bring other employees from modesto, other employees and food from fresno. so, the fact that this event hires locally 58 out of 60 local restaurants i think speaks miles for what it does for the city. one other minor point. [speaker not understood] had one of my cooks become ill on friday night
and create an environment so he could win politically. he set up after this quotation a rare weekend session in the senate where he had two votes . no republican amendments were allowed, and he showed republicans were obstructionists and would not go along with what he thought was good for the country. this was a ploy designed to shift attention from the democrats' ability to go along with what republicans wanted to do to republican saying they did not want to do what democrats wanted to do. he was seeking to control the agenda. that is the real issue here. there are times when minorities of both parties will obstruct the majority because they need or want to. the real issue in the debate today is one of agenda control. -- we have a way to think about this. in political science, if you look at the way house majority participate, it tells us about the way the senate majority is trying to behave today. they try to structure the environment so they can win, and they do so, but controlling the agenda at preventing the minority from participating in the process. that is not a surprise to anyone.
when it does. imagine classroom in a blended learning environment where rich digital content comes from the very best providers where teachers are managing the learning experience for students. where it's competency based. we don't sit our butt in the seat for 180 days and say it's time to take three months off and come back and sit our slighter bigger butts down for another 180 days. we move to a system where if you master the material you are not held back. if you haven't mastered the terrible you're not bushed along. the accountability to customize the learning experience in a powerful way is what technology offers. that requires changes of law. many states are embracing element of what is the digital learning revolution. in doing so, i think they will accelerate learning in ways that will create the gaps. we will see them begin to narrow and it will create real opportunity for continuous improvement and advancement. the final thing i'm going tell you talk to you about is about another book. that's the book being a texan by birth and floridian by choice. i have a little texas her tib
was trying to do, i believe, was set the agenda and create an environment so that he could win politically and set up after the quote, a rare weekend session in the senate where he had two votes, no republican amendments allowed, and he set this up to show that republicans were obstructionists, and that they would not go along with what he said was good for the country, and this was a public relations ploy designed to shift attention from the democrats inability to come along with what republicans wanted to do, which is fine, their prerogative k to republicans saying we don't want to go along with what the democratsment to do. in short, he was seeking to control the agenda, and i think that's the real issue here. certainly, there are times when minorities of both parties obstruct the majority because they need to or want to, but the real issue is one of agenda control. if you -- we actually have a way to think about this, you know, in political science, and, you know, norm knows more than i do, but look at house majority parties, hey, that tells us a lot how they behave today. they try to
on t.v. commercials painting themselves as the great greatest friend the environment had. i want to throw up when i see those things on the network news but they are run them all the time. >> absolutely. >> they are slick, you know. they are like those that wal-mart was running, look at these women and minorities that work at wal-mart, you know, and bp, they have these people down there talking about what a great company they are and how much they have done to clean up the environment. so they are waging a huge pr campaign to try to get their reputation back. >> absolutely. i mean it would have been great if, as part of the criminal settlement that the department of justice got that they forced -- that they would have forced bp to disclose what their advertising and marketing budget has been. bp has been giving lots of cash to the tourism bureaus of gulf states. >> yeah. buying them off. >> i am all for the gulf states trying to get folks back to that great part of the country, but we need to be honest here, that this was a corporation that has a lo
and their solutions when trying to create a respectful, open environment for all their children and families. children like to feel good about themselves. they enjoy the feeling of not only knowing who they are but also that others appreciate them, respect them, and value their participation in and contribution to the group. children know differences between people's skin color and gender at a very early age... man: ok, guys. child: hey, des. second child: hey, des. third child: hi. he's got his sister. you're his sister. hendrick: which is why it's so important to begin a program of cross-cultural, non-sexist education as early as possible. woman: what we're going to do is... hendrick: our message is a simple one-- that being different, whether in sex, race, culture, or ability, does not mean inferior. or everything was blue. not like that. you said you wanted that shirt. now, wear it. woman: doina, ian gets to decide what he wants to wear, just like you picked that pretty white dress for wearing. hendrick: our challenge in this program is to learn how to teach the principle of equity-- that, while w
environment? all these special dividends. oracle is doing it now, second quarter, third quarter dividends this month so investors can get taxed at the 2012 dividend rate. >> it's bigger than that because it's not only the corporation themselves but corporate executives. cashing out options looking for preferential tax treatment there as well. that's just prudent corporate management. you can't fault them. stocks paying special dividends have been outperforming the spx in the time period since this started happening. in some ways in the convoluted way it's been a positive for the market. >> oracle is down, though o this news. >> oracle is down right now. gordon, you make a really good point. that's where the performance has been, the conditions paying these special dividends. when i see an announcement like this, you as an investor, would you buy these companies paying special dif depends to make sure the tax rate is a low rate versus what we may see in 2013? >> certainly it might be an opportunity short term, over a short horizon. i'm not sure i want to lend to those companies. i'm the bo
cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
and is trying to adapt. >> i think he is an and french environment, surrounded by journalists. they are asking questions in english. he is trying to fit in. i think it is natural. some people will do it, some people will not. >> it has happened before. here is his manager doing patch. >> i knew when i came here, i thought maybe one of them would drop, and it is arsenal. >> meanwhile, which is between languages, never mind that sense, what does he think about the french? >> i have not heard it. i am not optimistic about his performance. it is a little bit boring. >> there are always questions. so we wait to hear if he will answer like this. only once. >> a doping has given the sports world a bad name recently and now the man leading the charge against drugs says that a lack of testing is sending a man -- dreadful message. the president of the anti- dumping agency accused football and other sports of failure of leadership. >> lance armstrong is now the top symbol of a failure to tackle drugs. the fallout is posing questions for all sports in the fight against doping. armstrong showed the gruesom
want to know why. >> environment. environmental impact? >> reporter: not san francisco. but eastern marin where there's already active research on breast cancer clusters. >> it's an opportunity to look at those areas, all the areas and see what is different and what's similar. >> barlo and fellow researchers says their study did not find a common cause. lifestyle, delay childbirth, bottle water, hormone replacement therapy have all been apropossed. >> if it's full t it's all over the by a area i think the important thing is to look at environmental causes. >> activists say this should trigger calls for ax. researchers -- action. researchers say it has to be something. >>> federal officials are expected to decide this week the fate of a family owned oyster farm. seeking a ten year extension of the current federal permit to harvest oysters. some environmental list says says they're they're opposed to extension. he's expected to make a decision by friday. >>> now to capital hill why un ambassador susan rice met with senators regarding her comments about the deadly september 11th attack
profits out of this rescue package if the politics are able to stabilize the political environment. this also helps the financial community. >> and a quick look at the market numbers now -- the dax closed 0.5% up. euro stoxx 50 closing just slightly up. across the atlantic, the dow jones is currently going down, and the euro is trading at $ 1.2933. the world's biggest economy is bracing itself for an economic nightmare. unless u.s. lawmakers reach a budget deal in january 1, a raft of temporary tax cuts are due to expire, and spending cuts will take effect. >> that means the u.s. is charging full speed at the fiscal cliff. the dramatic fiscal tightening triggered by this press this could tip the u.s. and possibly the whole global economy into recession. here is more. >> precision craftsmanship, made in the usa the marlon still company in baltimore produces wire baskets for the automobile, defense, and medical industries. it is one of the fastest-growing companies in the u.s. the company president wants to keep it that way, but at the moment, he is holding off on further investments
. officials at the environment ministry hav a asked to have storage sites built on their land. government authorities are concerned about the safety of such facilities. they said the central government must be made aware na accepting the proposal does not mean they will allow the building of these facilities. >> we decided to accept the survey because there are various things that can't be known until it is carried out. >> a resident evacuated from one of the towns expressed her feeling about the surveys being accepted. >> translator: i think we will never be able to go back home in our lifetime. we really have no other choice. nowhere else accepts such a thing. >> japan's ancient capital kyoto draws a constant stream of admirers to its gardens, temples and treasures. the crowds are especially intense at this time when the city's trees explode in fall colors. nhk world's rina nakano has been enjoying the autumn hues at a temple with a twinkle. >> we are mixing it up by bringing an autumn nightscape. today we're at a zen buddhist temple northeast of kyoto station. the biggest attraction is
better for us. we thank the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the legislation. to those affects and to those who are supporting the people affected by this issue, really, it's serving as kind of a buffer to what could have been a real crisis. as a housing rights advocate for the mission collaborative for the past five years and a friend of many people who have had bed bugs i have wintered firsthand the devastating affects on lives. and so i can really appreciate this a[pro-rb/] and thank you to the working group that put this together. it puts in place procedures and policies that make it easier for housing advocates and tenant communitis to navigate this process, but we know we can put what we like on paper and promise to follow it to the best our abilitis and commit t
came all the way from israel to meet the people and hang out and she was amazing. >> the environment, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is
it comes to or shared values, marriage equality, environment. we are a becon to the rest of the world when it comes to our sports. i was proud a couple years ago to carry the legislation around america's cup bid to work with mayor lee to work with the warriors. i'm particularly pleased to work with supervisor ferrell and 49ers organization to make sure we win this bid. in my first couple weeks i put in a call to a young man named jed york. along with colleagues who were new in 2009 we asked you to consider sticking around in the city. while we may someday curse you for stop take our blessed team out of the city, we love the fact we are working together on this bid. we love that our 49er also continue to play great football down the street. we love the fact we still have hometown pride in the best football team in the franchise. thank you. looking forward to getting this done. [applause] >> i want to reiterate two points and open up to questions, if you have them for the folks up here. this will be the most shared super bowl super bowl bid ever. that is the key, hash tag super bowl and help
, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, president jimmy carter signed into law a joint resolution to officially designate the annual celebration. 11 years later, presi
contribution to the local business environment and the local economy. last september, we learned that the regulations for entertainment permits for karaoke recently changed and we moved immediately to try to move festa into compliance with the current regulations, we filed the application right away, unfortunately i had to leave for europe almost immediately after, but we worked closely with the commission throughout and we completed i think all the necessary inspections and approvals from the city departments including the police department, the fire department, building including basic building and electrical, public health and the planning department. we also completed a fairly extendbacker extensive outreach program per the good neighbor policy, we talked with a large number of the surrounding businesses in the same building and masae's also made contact with people who are living in the immediate vicinity, and they gave very nice favorable comments on festa. i would like to say by the way, we very much appreciated the commission's help and guidance as we moved through this
of operating environment that we do, mostly in mixed traffic, is going to make that 85% number difficult to achieve, even with all the investment that we have. however, we believe that this level of core funding, this $250 million a year level, will have a significant impact on muni performance and not just the ontime performance, but the spacing of the buses, the reliability of the buses. and i'm going to talk a little more about that. you know, would we like to have twice as much funding, could we do a lot more with more funding, yes. we are trying to be smart and strategic with the resources that we have, recognizing that we're not going to have $500 million a year to build a new subway station for every station under market street at the end of its useful life. we're trying to be strategic and focus on things that will directly impact transit performance. >> supervisor wiener: i understand. i think the question and the point i think we're agreeing on is that the current plan level of investment is not going to sort of complete the task, in terms of getting muni's vehicle fleet into t
the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedic
in this environment and continue to proceed and be successful. i mean it when we say -- what we end up doing is so different. we work to scale every day. we invite the people that we serve every day. thank you to the nominees. to our leadership, thank you. thank you to all the winners and to all the people we get to work with and serve. thanks. [applause] >> let's hear it for the tax team. [applause] >> parking is a universal quality of life issue. it touches on so many different parts of the transportation system. we were looking for ways to make parking easier and more convenient. >> in the beginning, we looked at parking throw san francisco, and her desire to price parking based on demand is how it started. >> for 70 years, we've used flat meter rates and short time limits. that did not always work so well. it did not make it easier to find a parking space. sf park has two main components. the whole point is to get them off the road quickly. and to create more of an spaces. we're doing the man-responsive pricing. we're obligated to find the lowest rate possible. generally, most of the time, the
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
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